Get Healthy Hiking Picacho Peak State Park

by Micah Powell, Mayor, City of Eloy

Welcome to another beautiful spring season in Eloy and Pinal County.

As this Golden Corridor Living edition focuses on medical, health, and wellness, I want to talk about getting outside and enjoying the spring weather, flowers and trail system in the Picacho Mountains including Newman Peak which rises from the desert floor to over 4,500 feet in elevation.


Although it can be a more challenging hike than the better-known Picacho Peak, you will find ancient petroglyphs and unique Sonoran desert plants and animals. For the best way to begin your Picacho Mountains adventure, check out www.alltrails.com/trail/us/arizona/newman-peak-southeast-face or www.alltrails.com/trail/us/arizona/picacho-mountains-petroglyph-sites.

A more familiar setting is Picacho Peak, home of Picacho Peak State Park and the only Civil War site in Arizona. According to the Arizona State Parks website:

“Visitors traveling along I-10 in southern Arizona can’t miss the prominent 1,500-foot peak of Picacho Peak State Park. Enjoy the view as you hike the trails that wind up the peak and, often in the spring, overlook a sea of wildflowers. The park and surrounding area are well known for their unique geological significance, outstanding and varied desert growth, and historical importance. The unique shape of Picacho Peak has been used as a landmark by travelers since prehistoric times. One of the first recordings was in the 1700s by the Anza Expedition as it passed through the area. Many hiking trails traverse the desert landscape and offer hikers both scenic and challenging hikes. Enjoy the beauty of the desert and the amazing views.”

In the spring, Picacho Peak is world renown for the magnificent display of wildflowers that truly is nature at its best. For more info about visiting Picacho Peak check out Picacho Peak Arizona State Park at www.azstateparks.com/picacho.

If those adventures seem too physical or you’re more interested in history and culture, plan a visit to the Sunland Visitor Center in Eloy at 3725 N. Camelot St. This lovingly restored school is the centerpiece of a visitor center that houses the Santa Cruz Valley Historic Museum.

Learn about how the indigenous people lived off the land when the Spanish first explored the region, when cotton was king, and the current transition to manufacturing and now electric vehicle manufacturing.

Get out and explore. The Sonoran desert is beautiful and has a wonderful history. What a great way to stay healthy!

See you on the trail.